Practical Strategies

Scenic Conservation
March 27, 2011
Spring Has Sprung
May 2, 2011
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Practical Strategies

One of the implementation strategies for scenic conservation issues along the Byway is volunteer effort. Adopt a roadside is one of these volunteer efforts. But Kyle Donahue demonstrated another possibility at the Dunsbach Ferry site as he completed his Eagle Scout Project. The site is at the intersection of Clamsteam Road and Canal Road in Halfmoon.

One of the implementation strategies for scenic conservation issues along the Byway is volunteer effort.  Adopt a roadside is one of these volunteer efforts.  But Kyle Donahue demonstrated another possibility at the Dunsbach Ferry site as he completed his Eagle Scout Project.  The site is at the intersection of Clamsteam Road and Canal Road in Halfmoon.

BEFORE

Historic Dunsbach Ferry site before improvements. Photo courtesy of David Raphael.

Two years ago the site looked like this from the road.  The site needed much attention, improved interpretation and better accessibility.

The Town of Halfmoon administered an FHWA Byway Grant for interpretation of this and another site along Canal Road.  An interpretive sign was installed in the spring of 2009, but the site still needed work to improve accessibility and to tie it with the Byway.

Historic Dunsbach Ferry site Interpretive sign

Historic Dunsbach Ferry site interpretive sign as installed in the spring of 2009. Photo courtesy of Nelson Ronsvalle.

Then came Kyle Donahue who marshaled his Boy Scout Troop, friends and family.  He adopted the site for his community service project as he worked toward his Eagle Scout rank.  Improvements included the addition of rail fencing that better defines the site and draws the passer by into the site.  The Town provided some crushed stone which the Scouts graded over the sloping access to the site.

Although the site does slope toward the the Mohawk River naturally, the improvements not only make the site much more attractive, but also handle the drainage from Clamsteam Road much better.  Nelson Ronsvalle from the Town of Halfmoon points out, “Low or no cost improvements can have big scenic impacts for the Byway.”

Rail fencing draws the passer-by into and defines the site.  Photo by Nelson Ronsvalle.

Rail fencing draws the passer-by into and defines the site. Photo by Nelson Ronsvalle.

This is a great example of an “early win” for the scenic conservation implementation along the Mohawk Towpath Byway. Thank you Eagle Scout Kyle Donahue!

View of the site from water's edge with Canal Road in the right background.  Photo by Nelson Ronsvalle.

View From water's edge with Canal Road in the right background. Photo by Nelson Ronsvalle.

We will be taking our next steps in scenic conservation starting with the second of three workshops on scenic conservation to be held at the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor Visitor Center, Peebles Island, Waterford on April 11, 2011. A third workshop will be held in the central part of the Byway in May. The final draft of the scenic conservation action plan should be available for review by fall of 2011.

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